APHIS will test feral swine for diseases of concern for U.S. pork producers, such as classical swine fever, which does not exist in the United States, as well as swine brucellosis, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome, swine influenza, and pseudorabies.  Ensuring that domestic swine are not threatened by disease from feral swine helps ensure that U.S. export markets remain open.   

APHIS aims to have the program operating within 6 months and funding for the comprehensive project includes, among other things:

  • $9.5 million for state projects.
  • $1.4 million for establishing procedures for disease monitoring, including the development of new surveillance and vaccination methods.
  • $1.5 million for WS’ National Wildlife Research Center to conduct research and economic analyses to improve control practices
  • $1.6 million for the centralization of control operations, and for making them safer and more cost-effective.

Initial state funding levels will be based on current feral swine populations and associated damage to resources.  Because feral swine populations, like most wildlife, cross international borders, APHIS will also coordinate with Canada and Mexico on feral swine damage management.

“We’ve already begun this type of work through a pilot program in New Mexico,” said Avalos.  “Through this pilot program, we have successfully removed feral swine from 5.3 million acres of land.  By applying the techniques such as trap monitors and surveillance cameras we have developed through this pilot project, we aim to eliminate feral swine from two states every three to five years and stabilize feral swine damage within 10 years.”