From fiber quality to secondary insects and the issues in between that affect cotton production, the Southeast Cotton Conference will have you covered.

Farm Press has lined up what promises to be a good mix of the issues and concerns facing cotton producers today in the upper Southeast. The annual Conference is slated for Jan. 22, 2002, at the Gov. W. Kerr Scott Building at the North Carolina State Fairgrounds in Raleigh. The Conference begins at 9 a.m. Breakfast is being sponsored by Monsanto. The morning break is being provided by Stoneville Pedigreed Seed. John Deere and Company is sponsoring the lunch.

Pesticide credits have been applied for with the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

Price tops the list of concerns cotton farmers have these days. Once you get past price, however, the talk is of fiber quality. To discuss this important topic, we'll have representatives from the major cottonseed companies, a university breeder, and a university cotton specialist to discuss the concerns as well as the solutions for the problem. Officials at seed companies will discuss what's coming in the variety pipeline. The university breeder will discuss his views on the topic of fiber quality as well as tell about his breeding program. The North Carolina State University cotton specialist will discuss what can be done about fiber quality in the field. Speakers will first talk about the problem from their various perspectives and then be available for questions in a panel discussion.

Mark Lange with the National Cotton Council will present the cotton outlook for the coming year. A textile industry official will talk about the current situation in that segment and its future.

With the advent of Roundup Ready cotton and stacked-gene technology, cotton farmers aren't the only ones involved in change. The shift toward this technology has also affected the insect populations. Secondary insects have become more of a primary problem in Roundup Ready cotton. The North Carolina State Extension entomologist will address this change. Entomologists from South Carolina, North Carolina and Virginia will also provide an insect update in the three-state region.

The production aspect of the Conference will also address topics such as defoliation, varieties, weed control and seed rot.

On the producer side, a North Carolina cotton grower will discuss the benefits he's gotten from precision agriculture over the past four year.

We invite you to the Southeast Cotton Conference Jan. 22, 2002, at the Gov. W. Kerr Scott Building at the North Carolina State Fairgrounds in Raleigh. The Conference begins at 9 a.m. We look forward to seeing you there. Thank you.