Complaining about the rain has been one of the most popular activities this winter and early spring in the upper Southeast. For the most part, soil moisture levels have been replenished.

It has also kept farmers out of the fields, according to the Agricultural Statistics Division of the North Carolina Department of Agriculture.

By mid-April, creeks, rivers and bottomlands were flooded across the Tar Heel state, making fieldwork difficult.

Corn planting is behind schedule. Wet conditions have prevented fumigation of tobacco acres and some greenhouse transplants are yellowing due to lack of sunlight.

Statewide, 87 percent of the soil is registering a surplus of moisture. No area of the state is short on soil moisture.

In Aurora, rainfall is about 7 inches above normal. Lincolnton is 9 inches above its normal rainfall so far this year. Roanoke Rapids is a little more than 4 inches above normal. Rocky Mount is almost 4 inches above normal, as is Williamston. Laurinburg is about an inch ahead of its normal rainfall. Lexington is about a half an inch above normal. Eden is more than 5 inches above normal and Elizabeth City is almost 6 inches above normal. North Wilkesboro is more than 4 inches above its normal rainfall for the year. Kinston is 3.41 inches above normal. Oxford is almost 6 inches above normal and Charlotte is almost 5.5 inches above normal.

Fayetteville is only location that is slightly under its normal rainfall for the year, and it is running a 2-inch deficit.

e-mail: cyancy@primediabusiness.com