DuPont has received registration approvals from the state of Florida for Coragen and Altacor insect control products. These two new insecticides, powered by DuPont rynaxypyr, offer growers fast-acting and long-lasting control of a wide range of pests that do costly damage to crops.

This new breakthrough mode of action insecticide delivers the protection necessary to help growers achieve high-quality, high-yielding fruit and vegetable crops.

DuPont received registration approval for Coragen and Altacor from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in early May. To date, DuPont has received registration approvals in more than 40 states for Coragen and Altacor including key growing regions such as: California, Florida, Georgia, Michigan, Oregon, Pennsylvania and Texas.

“There isn't another technology on the market that has a spectrum of activity and the residual performance similar to rynaxypyr,” said David Schuester, University of Florida. “If a producer finds there are multiple pests present, this will give him an option of making an application of single product, rather than a tank-mix of products.”

Rynaxypyr has an outstanding environmental profile, making both Coragen and Altacor an excellent fit in integrated pest management programs. This new technology provides highly effective control of target pest species at low use rates, but with minimal impact on beneficial species.

“We are excited to be able to offer new insect control solutions to our retailers and growers,” said Lars Swanson, rynaxypyr portfolio manager — DuPont Crop Protection. “With its new mode of action, Coragen and Altacor will provide a significant change in insect control strategies, offering more solutions for resistance management. In field trials conducted in Florida last year, we observed excellent insect control across different growing conditions.”

Coragen is registered for use on a wide range of vegetable crops, including lettuce, peppers and tomatoes. Altacor is registered for use in grapes and pome fruit crops such as apples and stone fruit crops such as peaches and cherries.