This daily water use is then modified using weather data — which can be automatically drawn from state networks or input for individual fields, depending on grower preference.

As the grower develops their own profile, each field can be managed separately and processed by PeanutFARM to accurately predict the need for irrigation and optimum harvest time.

The purpose of PeanutFARM is to provide the producer with tools to ease both in-season and harvest management decisions.

Another irrigation scheduling tool is Irrigator Pro for Peanuts, developed at the National Peanut Research Laboratory in Dawson, Ga. This computerized expert system is designed to manage peanut irrigation and pest management decisions.

The objective is to improve economic returns for irrigated peanut production and reduce risk associated with aflatoxin, foreign material, immaturity, off-flavor, chemical residues and negative environmental impact.

Irrigation recommendations for Irrigator Pro are based on more than 25 years of scientific research data and information. Generally, irrigation recommendations are made to maintain soil temperatures and water in the optimum ranges. 

Graphs can be viewed to show the maximum and minimum soil temperatures in relation to the optimum zones, and the cumulative water use in a field.

These graphs are useful in determining how Irrigator Pro is performing in a particular situation and can help in diagnosing any problems that may be occurring.

Yield increases of over 300 pounds per acre and 2 percentage point increases in Sound Mature Kernels and Sound Splits have been demonstrated from the use of the program.

Irrigator Pro models are also available for cotton and corn production.

phollis@farmpress.com

 

Other articles in the series:

New, improved varieties leading way for U.S. production

X-ray vision points to more efficient peanut grading system

Early-season disease control keeps peanut yield foe at bay

Lack of nematicides slows use of variable rate application in peanuts

Taking guesswork out of determining peanut maturity