“At the end of the year, they go on a special trip, something the mentor father loves to do and can impart wisdom to the boy.”



Drewry and his wife have made a commitment to an 11-year-old named Evan, whose father is not involved in his life.

 “Evan and I are going on a fishing trip in the spring with other mentor fathers and kids,” Drewry said.

“It’s something that boy can look forward to all year. Of course, we talk about it each month. To sum this ministry in a few sentences, it’s an intentional effort to address the wound of fatherlessness — when a father leaves — through a relationship with Jesus Christ. We are an unapologetic Christian ministry.” 



Drewry knows there are other mentoring programs and programs to get kids in the outdoors, but he’s concerned the interaction doesn’t go deep enough.



“We encourage others not to have a drive-by mentoring approach,” he said. “We hope they will truly engage that particular child. It’s all about one child at a time, and really make a difference in that boy’s life.”



“Fathers in the Field” works with boys ages 7 to 17.

 “Our initiative for the girls is that we encourage the women in churches to work with the female siblings, but this is a boys’ program,” Drewry said.

“We look for fatherless boys in the church. If there isn’t a fatherless child in that particular church, we reach out to the community and work with the school systems and counselors.



“Even if the mentor is not a hunter or fisherman, any outdoor pursuit is fine, whether it’s biking or even working on cars. Anything outdoors is fine. We’re using that activity as an icebreaker into the relationship. Boys like to do things.

“So, instead of asking a man to leave his comfort zone, we tell them to use something they’re skilled at, not as a selfish pursuit, but as a way to engage a fatherless boy.”



Of course, as far as Drewry is concerned, the outdoors is the perfect place to mentor the fatherless youth. 

“We refer to it as God’s classroom,” he said.

“If you take kids from an urban setting and get them outside around a campfire, there’s something that happens there. Men are rooted in adventure. These boys have an adventurous spirit, and they need an opportunity to get out and get their feet and hands dirty and have fun.”