Farmers in 92 Kentucky counties will share $30.5 million in federal funds to repair farm structures and land damaged by an unprecedented ice storm Jan. 27 that brought down thousands of trees and utility lines across the state.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has announced that Kentucky will receive 43 percent of the $71 million in Emergency Conservation Program funds, far more than any other state.

“I’m extremely pleased with the teamwork among the many Kentuckians who worked to present our case and caused the USDA to recognize the hardships our farmers went through last winter,” Agriculture Commissioner Richie Farmer said. “Every cent of this money will be put to good use to remove debris, fix fences, repair storm-damaged structures and restore damaged fields across our Commonwealth.”

Farms in the following Kentucky counties are eligible to receive a portion of the $30.5 million to repair ice storm damage: Adair, Anderson, Ballard, Barren, Bath, Bourbon, Boyd, Boyle, Breathitt, Breckinridge, Bullitt, Butler, Caldwell, Calloway, Carlisle, Carter, Casey, Christian, Clark, Crittenden, Daviess, Edmonson, Elliott, Estill, Fayette, Floyd, Franklin, Fulton, Garrard, Graves, Grayson, Green, Greenup, Hancock, Hardin, Hart, Henderson, Henry, Hickman, Hopkins, Jackson, Jefferson, Jessamine, Johnson, Knott, LaRue, Lawrence, Lee, Leslie, Letcher, Lewis, Lincoln, Livingston, Logan, Lyon, Madison, Magoffin, Marion, Marshall, Martin, McCracken, McLean, Meade, Menifee, Mercer, Metcalfe, Montgomery, Morgan, Muhlenberg, Nelson, Nicholas, Ohio, Oldham, Owen, Owsley, Perry, Pike, Powell, Rockcastle, Russell, Scott, Shelby, Spencer, Taylor, Todd, Trigg, Union, Warren, Washington, Webster, Wolfe and Woodford.

Madison County will also receive $500,000 to repair tornado damage sustained on May 8.

Conservation issues that existed before the ice storm are not eligible for cost-share assistance. USDA's Farm Service Agency county committees determine land eligibility based on on-site inspections of ice storm damage, taking into account the extent of the damage.