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United Nations wants you to eat more bugs

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It's called entomophagy, which is the $10 word for the practice of eating bugs for nourishment, and according to the U.N’s Food and Agriculture Organization, it could be the key to global food security in the future ... if you can stomach it. 

We dared Allen to eat another one. He and we, the boys egging him on, were in the second grade. We thought it was the coolest thing we’d ever seen. The handful of girls looking on thought it was the grossest. And with a dirty grin on his face, he reached down and picked through the grass to find another. When he leaned back up, he held the grasshopper up for all to see and then popped it into his mouth. You could hear the crunch. The girls scattered. The exact response we had hoped for. The rest of us reached down into the grass to find a bug of our own and took off after the girls with it.

And who knew that Allen on that elementary school playground more than 30 years ago was doing what man has for ages and what the United Nations now says we should all do more: eat bugs.

I thought about this boy-eating-bug scene as I listened to a radio talk show recently. I was driving home to Georgia on a trip back from Mississippi. The learned man on the radio called it entomophagy, which is the $10 word for the practice of eating bugs for nourishment. And according to the U.N’s Food and Agriculture Organization, it could be the key to future food security, or that’s what they say in the report “Edible Insects: Future prospects for food and feed security” released earlier this year.

Insect eating is nothing new for many parts of the world. Tribes in Africa and Australia eat beetles, ants and larvae as part of their subsistence diets. Folks in Thailand like crispy-fried locusts and beetles. The bug-eating expert said at least 2 billion people worldwide regularly eat bugs, and that many more ought to think about it.

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