Farm Press Blog

On-farm remote sensing will be more valuable in the future

RSS

Table of Contents:

• Had there been problems, like insect or disease damage in the field, I’m sure the high resolution photographs taken by the drone would have exposed them without anyone having to trudge through the waist-high field of beans.

Having finished an abbreviated interview with a Virginia grower early one afternoon — as he scurried about trying to harvest some corn before more rains came, I decided to drive out to Land of Promise Farms, site for the annual Virginia Ag Expo, which was set for the next morning.

As I turned onto the farm road leading to the Expo site, I noticed what I first thought to be a strange looking bird. Next, I thought maybe it was an ultra-light aircraft, farther away than I first thought. Upon closer inspection, it appeared to be an over-sized toy helicopter that hovered and then moved away from various spots in a waist-high field of soybeans.

Other late afternoon passersby on Land of Promise Road seemed equally intrigued by the strange looking aircraft, as several had pulled their vehicles to the side of the road to watch as the small, pilot-less aircraft darted about up and down and across the field.

Rolling down the window of my car to take a closer look, it was the buzzing sound that brought back a previous encounter with one of these machines. I was in North Queensland, Australia looking at cotton in an area the Aussies call ‘the table tops’. A PCACC, or professional certified agriculture crop consultant, was ‘buzzing,’ as he later told me a cotton field to determine whether the crop was ready for defoliation.

I filed that afternoon in Australia away for future use, thinking this technology could certainly benefit farmers in the U.S. That was nearly 10 years ago and there still seems to be little, if any, use of this technology in the Southeast.

Snapping back from my distant memories of my 23 days in Australia and New Zealand, I watched from my roadside view as the odd looking aircraft glided back toward a large tent that I deemed to be part of the next day’s Virginia Agriculture Expo and the most likely location of the person controlling the drone.

The next day I had a chance to visit with Jim Owen, a relatively new assistant professor and agriculture researcher at Virginia Tech. Owen and a research colleague Joe Mari Maja, from the University of Florida, had mapped the soybean field the previous day and showed an interested audience of farmers, agricultural Extension workers and crop consultants the high resolution photos taken by what I now know was a drone.

In about 30 minutes the drone had mapped a 100 acre or so field of soybeans, providing a wealth of information about the crop. Had there been problems, like insect or disease damage in the field, I’m sure the high resolution photographs taken by the drone would have exposed them without anyone having to trudge through the waist-high field of beans.

 

Want the latest in ag news delivered daily to your inbox? Subscribe to Southeast Farm Press Daily. It’s free!

Please or Register to post comments.

What's Farm Press Blog?

The Farm Press Daily Blog

Connect With Us

Blog Archive
Continuing Education Courses
New Course
The 2,000-member Weed Science Society of America’s (WSSA) Herbicide Resistance Action...
New Course
The course details six of the primary diseases affecting citrus: Huanglongbing (Citrus...
Potassium nitrate has a positive effect in controlling plant pests and diseases when applied...

Sponsored Introduction Continue on to (or wait seconds) ×