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Drinkable-food developer slams farms

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If not for this being in National Geographic, I’d likely not write this blog about this fellow. But I have a real problem with the publication giving space to a product developed by a fellow who to me is talking out of both sides of his mouth.

When I read the short National Geographic story, I was confused. It states a computer programmer turned nutrition drink developer who feels “the future of food isn’t in farms and animal husbandry.” What?

The computer-programmer-turned-entrepreneur has made a drinkable food sort of like a milkshake that he’s marketing to replace real food, looking to get it manufactured and offered in the U.S. this month as an efficient, sustainable food source. Seems he feels slamming modern farming practices can help him do this.

If not for this being in National Geographic, I’d likely not write this blog about this drink. But I’ve liked the magazine since I was a little boy dreaming of far-off places. And I have a real problem with the publication, which has a boasted circulation of 8.5 million worldwide with 5 million of that in the U.S., giving copy space to a product developed by a fellow who to me is talking out of both ends: wanting to slam commercial agriculture for his personal marketing gains, yet using what can only be commercially grown, agricultural commodity ingredients for his drink, even as he claims food should one day be independent of farms.

I’ll explain.

Curious, I looked the stuff up, the drinkable food, wondering what sort of healthy food product could be made by not using farm-based commodity ingredients, again something the developer implied he’d like to see happen in the future with food. I was also confused by his statement because the very name of his drink has “Soy” in the name. It also has a long list of vitamins and minerals in it.

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